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In the year 2000, at the turn of the century, the U.S. Federal Occupational Safety & Health Administration, OSHA, issued a Letter of Interpretation wherein it opined that aerial lifts known as scissors lifts (see illustration) are not aerial lifts but instead are mobile scaffolds.  The opinion was...
My experience indicates that people easily get confused about suspended scaffolds.  I’m not sure why that is other than it may have something to do with their knowledge, or lack thereof, of suspended scaffolds and how they work.  This shouldn’t be surprising since most people base their knowledge...
The OSHA standards require a scaffold user to have training. One of the requirements of that training is that the user must know “The maximum intended load and the load carrying capacities of the scaffold used” [29 CFR 1926.454(a)(4)].  (In case you are wondering, erectors are suppose to know this...
Since scaffolding includes many types of products used in many different applications, it is difficult to address all the specific issues that may develop during the use of scaffolding.  In other words, there are a lot of questions; here are a few.                    Do I need to know the OSHA...
It appears the U.S. Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA, has managed to thoroughly twist a well written scaffold regulation to the point where many scaffold erectors, users and compliance officers will be totally confused.  I am referring to a recent Letter of Interpretation...